Angkor What?

Sorry, but I saw it on a t-shirt…

I’m in Siem Reap to see Angkor, Cambodia’s wonder of the world.

Angkor Archaeological Site is about 400 sq km, and has magnificent ruins of the Khmer Empire from the 9th to 15th centuries.

‘Angkor Wat’ is the largest of dozens of temples in the whole site.

I met up with the fellow I travelled with in Battambang, and we made a plan. The first day we would do the ‘big’ loop, and the second day the ‘small’ to cover most of the temples.

The tuk tuk driver took us to the ticket pavilion, a huge new building. US$62 for two days ($34 for one day, $72 for a week). High tech ticket with photo.

Then it was another 30 minutes to our first stop, the South Gate, which leads to a bridge crossing the moat.

We also stopped at the North Gate where there were less people. At 07:30 it was already getting busy in the site, but nothing compared to later!

Then on to Preah Khan

Neak Pean

Ta Som

East Mebon

Very inhumane to ride elephants, but they certainly get your attention

Pre Rup

Mr Tin, our driver, catching a nap while we were climbing massive steps

Srah Srang lookout

Banteay Kdel

Banteay Srey Temple, a beautiful little temple we added to our itinerary. It was an additional hour trip but the breeze in the tuk tuk was very welcome. The weather has been 36 oC with high humidity, so sweat pours freely!

18 km and 16 floors the first day. Next day it was another early start, and we found the first hour very magical while the sun was gold and the crowds were thin.

Ta Proham

Angkor Wat, I think there were more tourists than rocks..

Bayon

350 m Terrace of Elephants, used as a viewing platform for the king

Siem Reap – another river, market, pagoda…

l

Pub Street, river at night

Cambodian Khmer soup for breakfast

Cambodian Khmer curry for lunch!

Its been an incredible few days. Photos cannot capture the massive scope of Angkor. A very magical place.

So farewell to Cambodia. Today I fly to Bangkok, Thailand.

3 thoughts on “Angkor What?

    1. Words can’t describe and photos can’t capture the feeling of awe walking through the ruins. There are villages in the site whose ancestors would have seen the area fully functioning.

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